Skip to main content

About your Search

20131202
20131210
SHOW
News 8
( more )
STATION
MSNBCW 33
CNNW 21
KGO (ABC) 15
ALJAZAM 14
KPIX (CBS) 13
WJLA (ABC) 11
WUSA (CBS) 8
CSPAN 6
KNTV (NBC) 6
KQED (PBS) 6
CSPAN2 5
WRC (NBC) 5
CNBC 2
KCSM (PBS) 2
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 173
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 173 (some duplicates have been removed)
inspire us. i said no, mr. mandela, you inspire us. so there was this unbelievable relationship between what was happening in america and what would happen in south africa. we would say from time to time the struggle in birmingham, the struggle in selma is inaccept raable from the struggle in sharpville. >> one of the reasons i wanted to talk to you today congressman was reading about and thinking about and trying to understand the importance of those decisions made by mandela and other apartheid leaders after sharpville, when they decided non-violence was not enough, they have been so committed to nonviolence, even in the face of incredible brutality, they needed some sort of military response as well. never ended up being the khai part of their response to apartheid, but they made that hard decision. how international were those discussions about the importance of non-violence and whether or not it was enough to overthrow governments and to change the world? >> here in america and around the world, there was ongoing discussion about the way of peace, the way of love, the way of non-vi
history continued. on the man who helped change so much. >> there is mr. nelson mandela, a free man taking his first step s. >> it was a long walk. a walk that lasted nearly a century. freedom and human dignity. a walk he ended up taking the whole world on. on behalf of our rainbow nation, i welcome you all. >> nelson mandela towered over. a moral and political strength and profound decency. >> rebirth that can now be realized. so that all of our children may play in the sun. >> mandela was born in 1918 into a royal family, but he grew up under apartheid, the the vicious cycle of segregation by which the white minority ruled south africa. it's hard today to imagine the pure evil of that system. abject poverty for blacks and restrictions on travel, education and employment. whites enjoyed all of the power and riches in this country. his triable name meant troublemaker so perhaps it was his des atindestiny. he became a leading agitator for change as an attorney. he and the african national congress took up armed struggle. >> will tl are many that feel it is useless for us to continue talking
foreign correspondent terry moran on the man who helped change so much. >> there is mr. nelson mandela, mr. nelson mandela, a free man taking his first steps into a new south africa. >> reporter: it was a long walk nelson mandela took, a walk that lasted nearly a century, a walk to freedom and human dignity. a walk he ended up taking the whole world on along with him. >> on behalf of our rainbow nation, i welcome you all. >> reporter: nelson mandela towered over them. a moral and political leader of surpassing strength, implacable determination, and profound decency. >> i am a product of africa. and the long-cherished dream of a rebirth that can now be realized. so that all of our children may play in the sun. >> reporter: mandela was born in 1918 into the royal family of the tembu people, but he grew up under apartheid, the vicious system of racial segregation and oppression by which the white minority ruled south africa. it's hard today to imagine the pure evil of that system. abject poverty for blacks and severe restrictions on travel, education and employment. whites enjoyed all of the
to me, john lewis, i know all about you. i follow you, you inspired us. and i said, no, mr. mandela, you inspired us. so that was just unbelievable relationship between what was happening in america and what would happen in south africa. we would say from time to time, the struggle in birmingham, the struggle in selma is inseparable from the struggle in sharpville. >> one of the reasons i wanted to talk to you today, congressman, was reading about and thinking about and trying to understand the importance of those decisions that was made by mandela and other anc leaders and other antiapartheid leaders after sharpville, when they decided that nonviolence wasn't enough. they had been committed to nonviolence in the way that you have been so overtly committed to nonviolence, throughout your life, throughout those struggles, even in the face of incredible physical brutality, and they decided when they saw those people massacred, they needed some kind of military response as well. never ended up being a key response of their response to apartheid, but they made that hard decision. how interna
[inaudible] prepares forfrica a state funeral of unprecedented proportions, what kind of nation mr. mandela leaves behind. is possible to overcome hatred and anger in order to build a new nation and a new society. lson mandela went to prison and a great young man. committed to letting his enemies by violence if necessary. byfighting as enemies violence if necessary. 27 years later he emerged preaching. can say withf you authority and confidence that i have traveled this long road to freedom. fight, i madenot missteps along the way. [inaudible]e cross.y more hills to >> his longtime collaborator archbishop desmond tutu gave ask for a friend and global icon. >> thank you for the gift of madiba. him andu for watching enable us to know what we can become. >> for decades of struggle. the system applied violence and racist ideology in equal measure to oppress south africa's black majority and keep the white elite in power. but having won the battle he shared hiseid, victory with his former oppressors. >> his greatest legacy to south africa and to the world is the emphasis which he has always put
a state funeral of unprecedented proportions, what kind of nation mr. mandela leaves behind. is possible to overcome hatred and anger in order to build a new nation and a new society. lson mandela went to prison and a great young man. committed to letting his enemies by violence if necessary. byfighting as enemies violence if necessary. 27 years later he emerged preaching. can say withf you authority and confidence that i have traveled this long road to freedom. fight, i madenot missteps along the way. [inaudible]e cross.y more hills to >> his longtime collaborator archbishop desmond tutu gave ask for a friend and global icon. >> thank you for the gift of madiba. him andu for watching enable us to know what we can become. >> for decades of struggle. the system applied violence and racist ideology in equal measure to oppress south africa's black majority and keep the white elite in power. but having won the battle he shared hiseid, victory with his former oppressors. >> his greatest legacy to south africa and to the world is the emphasis which he has always put on the need for reconcilia
his long captainity, mr. mandela left prison with his mind closed to any settling of scores and his heart open to those he had fought against. >> mandela in his fight for equality influenced not just world leaders, but also the people of the world. >> it's been an inspiration for generations growing up. he stood for the civil rights, not just people in south africa but people around the world and his legacy goes on. >> reporter: people here continuing to leave notes. one of them read, thank you for creating a pathway to freedom for all of us, a message that is being heard here and in other countries as well. michaela? >> very moving indeed. erin mclaughlin, thank you for that. >> the tributes are pouring in from all over the world this morning. president obama had some very, very poignant words to honor the late president of south africa. he actually invoked words that were used at president lincoln's funeral. >> he no longer belongs to us. he belongs to the ages. through his fierce dignity and bending will to sacrifice his own freedom for the freedom of others, madiba transformed s
. >> translator: mr. mandela said being deprived of freedom for 27 years of one's life is certainly a tragedy, but it gave him time to think. i think mr. mandela is the kind of person who believes there is a good and a bad side to everything, that nothing is 100% negative. >> reporter: mandela also ueda a necklace sporting the amc colors. she believes his loveable personality is the pillar that kept south africa from descending into chaos and hat d hatred. >> translator: i saw many people who criticized mr. mandela fall in love with him as soon as they met him in person for the first time. i think that's probably how he was able to pull his country together. mandela's charisma has spread well beyond his entourage and touched younger generations, including ueda's son. >> translator: i'd be happy if i can grow into even a fraction of the kind of person mr. mandela was. >> reporter: nelson mandela may have passed away, but his passion for dialogue his indomminable spirit and captivating wisdom are here to stay. mitsuko nishikawa, nhk world, tokyo. >>> violence continues in the central african r
. act the work, he was jailed and stabbed, and killed at 39. mr. mandela struggling he was jailed for 27 years. and choosing reconciliation over retribution. so they both have that moral character about them. mr. obama, on the other hand, he was a benefactor. so he come as generation behind, but dr. kick, and mr. mandela, and and drink king were also trance forty figures. >> we just saw a picture of you, with one of my colleague morgan ratford who got the chance to meet nelson mandela for the first time. tell me about the man you knew? >> your know, i must say when i was in cape town south africa, my son and i met him at the door, and he immediately recognized me and called my name. i was just overwhelmed. he knew what was going on. he was alive and alert. he didn't just read the speech that day. he at was a great debate. every time we have a private conversation whether it's my office or my home, they always were overwhelmed by the and breadth of his concerning interest. he also did not owe his politics because of his popularity. he kept reaching out to cuba, and castro, and why are you
that mr. mandela brought about in south africa. my visit with him in '96, i had the privilege of spending nearly an hour with him in his office in south africa. the thing that struck me the most about mr. mandela, when you are in the presence of someone viewed by his countrymen as george washington, abraham lincoln and martin luther king it's intimidating. the thing that struck me is how open and engaging and humorous he was. we had a great time talking and laughing. i said to myself, an icon should not be this happy and laughing. you know, i expected a stone figure and i found a very -- >> doctor, can you reflect on how nelson mandela impacted those that you managed during your tenure at universities like howard? >> caller: sure. i was president of howard for 13 years. during that time, prior to my becoming president, mr. mandela received an honorary degree from howard. it was the first honorary degree he received from an american university. we are proud of that. mr. mandela, when i visited with him reminded me of his visit to washington and howard. he asked a question whether or not th
with nelson mandela. mr. swatwali, thank you for joining us. give us some thoughts, what it was like during the apartheid regime. tell us what it was like, eye specially on robben island in prison. >> well, let me first say that our people in south africa and the world have lost . >>> that's what we learned from nelson mandela. during the dark days with him on robben island. today he is seen as an icon of the world, whose teachings, as well as principles need to be embraced by all. he was embraced even by his own jailers, because he demonstrated that through the power of dialogue through the elements and two of reconciliation, people on different sides, former enemies, can come together. that's how -- we solve our intractable problems. we concluded that in order for us to create a new democratic society for a united and nonviolent south africa was to embrace all people. that was seen through the -- >> i have a pictures, mr. sexwale, of the cell. it's robben island. i think we'll be able to show our viewers, a cell where mr. nelson mandela spent so many years. there it is right there. awful
that i have wasted in prison. >> mr. nelson mandela will be released from the prison. >> there is mr. nelson mandela, a free man taking his first steps into a new south africa. >> reporter: released at the age of 72, remained vigilant that his country and freedoms rested in the hands of the people. >> i stand here before you not as a prophet but as a humble servant. >> reporter: and for the people of south africa, mandela's release ushered in a new era of hope and the end of apartheid. >> today the majority of south africa, black and white, recognize that apartheid has no future. >> reporter: in 1994 south african's castheir ballot in the first democratic election. >> this morning applause for the first black voter in history. >> reporter: mandela became the country's president, the first elected by all its people. >> we are all south africans. we have had a good fight, but now this is a time to heal the old wounds and to build a new south africa. >> reporter: after ruling for five years, nelson mandela passed the torch to the next generation and became an elder statesman to the worl
. >> people cannot survive on $8.25 in this country. gwen: and -- we remember nelson mandela. >> there's mr. mandela, mr. nelson mandela, a free man taking his first steps into a new south africa. gwen: covering the week, jackie calmes of the "new york times," michael fletcher of "the washington post," and david wessel of "the wall street journal." >> award-winning reporting and analysis covering history as it happens. live, from our nation's capitol, this is "washington week" with gwen ifill. corporate funding for "washington week" is provided by -- we know inw-up, cyber world, threats are always evolving. we were protecting networks, then we were protecting the transfer of data, today, it's evolved to , finance, and military missions. constantly innovating to advance the front line in the cyber battle wherever it takes us. of performance. northrop grumman. additional corporate funding for "washington week" is provided by prudential. providedl funding is annenbergndation foundation, corporation for broadcasting and contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. once ag
at the south african embassy in washington. >> mr. mandela left a global legacy just from the reaction globally to his death, but you can't not be shocked. you can't the be sad. >> reporter: south african ambassador to the u.s. receiving the news from mandela's daughter. >> she knows how important the united states is to the mandela family and to south africa because it was here that so much happened where people marched for our freedom, were arrested for our freedom and that is why that statue is there. >> his ideas will live on. they will never die. >> reporter: people are meeting inside the embassy planning on events in the district to pay a proper tribute to nelson mandela. at the south african embassy on massachusetts avenue in northwest, surae chinn, wusa9. >> you can submit your videos, your photos, your remembrances of nelson mandela on our website, www.wusa9.com. that's where you will also find world reaction to his death along with some of the former south african leader's most memorable quotes. >>> d.c. police chief cathy lanier says there is no connection between a pair of alleged
morning, and how wonderful it is to speak with you. mr. mandela was an anc member, actually one of the founders of the african national union. african national congress i was married to a south african freedom fighter was a member of the pac, pan-african congress. they were archrivals. mr. mandela came to egypt where i was living and i had been so used to these rivals arguing and shouting in the living room and in the streets against each other. there was also southwest africa national organization. when mr. mandela came he never had a crossword to say to anyone. i was amazed. i had never seen south africans who were that kind. he had a consummate to give to everybody including my housekeeper and the doorman, it was amazing. a gentle giant he was. >> schieffer: you know, you have written a wonderful poem celebrating his life and his passing. the state department has put it out on a video, i want to ask you about it, how it came about. let me play just a short clip of the beginning of this poem. >> the news came on the wings of the wind reluctant carry its burden. nelson mandela
here a long long time. and you remember when mr. mandela came here. >> i do. i remember it was a day of joy for those of us that were here, we felt very very proud. i was standing on top of the apollo marque. and the motorcade was bringing mr. mandela up. i remember having binoculars in my hand, it really felt good. for a lot of us here it gave us a sense of hope, that finally something positive was being done in the world. that relates to us. i know some guys that got their life together just by nelson mandela visiting. they felt this sense of i have to get myself together, time is wasting. let me do my thing. and i think it was fitting that he came to harlem. where he saw his people. it was almost like a little reunion. nothing but blackness, he saw his people, felt good, gave some positive messages. he was at riverside church. it was a wonderful time. >> and only fitting that y'all put this marque up tonight in memory of nelson mandela, because when he was here, that marque was such a big part of his visit as well. >> that's true. when he came in 1990, he had just gotten out of pr
mandela. flags across the country remain at half-staff and will stay that way until mr. mandela is buried. michelle kaczynski is outside his home. tell us what you are seeing there. >> singing and dancing until at least 3:00 in the morning. even on the second day. i think what immediately strikes you and touches you is the incredible diversity of this crowd. people still coming together with their entire families and their friends. they will come here with a feeling of togetherness of truly moving sense of community. one boy 7 years old, drew a picture of house and trees. he drove here from a tiny village four hours away. she said a school was built. she said because of mandela, her child and the other kids there have a good education. plus, a huge pad of flowers on the gates lead to go mandela's home. people having their own gatherings. they will come here where they feel closer to mandela where he lived as well as closer to each other. >> michelle, we're having a little bit of trouble hearing your audio. i have to tell you what i love is how this nation, their mourning is so joyful. the
africa. >> we are one country. we are one people. >> one excludes the religious leaders, mr. mandela is the greatest person to have walked the face of the earth in human history. >> reporter: an icon not only for his fellow countrymen -- >> viva mandela! viva! >> reporter: -- but for the entire world. "nelson mandela." >> ladies and gentlemen. >> this is "headliners "headliners & legends" with lester holt. >> he is lauded the world over as a man of peace, a champion for the downtrodden. he suffered at the hands of racism and endured decades in prison only to emerge with his dignity intact, his spirit unbroken freedom fighter, ex-prisoner, nation builder. nelson mandela's legacy serves as a shining example not only for the people of the world today but for generations to come. >> reporter: nelson mandela's life begins far away from the turmoil, struggles and ultimate triumphs that will define his life. here in the transsky province of south africa, 550 miles south of johannesburg, mandela is born on july 18th, 1918. the name he is given will prove in a sense prophetic. >> nelson mande
, actually the marque was a big part of it. it said welcome home mr. and mrs. mandela. there were a huge crowds here, more than 100,000 people, there was a huge parade. a lot of people we spoke to today found out about his death as they were leaving work, and seeing this marque. and for people here, his sit sit brought a bit of hope. a lot of people remember him riding by is pointing at the apollo theater. he just mentioned how his visit game hope. people just appreciated him making the stop, when he could have stop sod many other places. so certainly sadness, and a lot of fond memories coming from the people that were here those years ago. so jonathan -- what else is expected -- are there any events expected to happen at the apollo tonight? >> well, not tonight, like i said -- you just have started here. people are finally just stopping by, many people sharing memory as lot of people have stopped by to speak to us, and say i remember back in 1990 that we were standing -- we were here on top of the marque. some people remember being -- really at this point no sort of planned memorial, or
the prime minister of new zealand, john key wrote, mr. mandela was a force for change not only in south africa, but around the world. reacting tonight, muhammad ali wrote, his was a spirit born free. destined to soar above the rainbows. today his spirit is soaring through the heavens. he is now forever free. new york's cardinal dolan wrote, nelson mandela was a hero to the world. his bravery in defending human rights against the great evil of apartheid made him a symbol of courage and dignity as well as an inspiration to people everywhere. and mandela's great friend, archbishop foundation wrote in his name his fearless generosity and leadership were in the service of transcending our differences by seeking our oneness as human beings. and here's the "new york" magazine cover, a tribute to the young mandela, young freedom fighter. tonight, bono, mandela's great supporter and friend wrote, in the end, nelson mandela showed us how to love rather than hate, not because he never surrendered to rage or violence but because he learned love would do a better job. >> andrea mitchell in our d.c.
with us. mr. mandela's death comes at a period of deep unease, writes the new york tiles. the past year and a half, the country faces the most serious unrest provokeed by a wave of angry miner, a deadly response on part of police, messy leadership struggle and deepening fishers between south africa's ruler masters. members of the party have said mr. mandela's near saintly legacy from years of struggle has been eroded by a scramble of self enrich. . nelson mandela died with his family around him at a hospital. it was brought to us by the south african president. he was born in transic south africa. he moved to end the regime. the impact of his efforts reconciled generosity and to find the common ground between humanity's higher values and his own power. john carlin once described him and said he'll ultimately reach beyond south africa's borders. this coming to us from black borders. prior to doing so, mandela earned a bachelor's degree during which time he was elected onto the student's representative council and suspended from college for joining a protest boycott. he was eququalified i
and since thursday night when mr. mandela's passing was announced. tomorrow will be truly significant and unique event. there are perhaps 95,000 people who will be allowed into the stadium and there will be tens and thousands more who will be try to be near there. the event of course is captivated the country and the world. security will be unprecedented. the south african security forces used protecting mr. mandela, the secret service and security forces here are sfam with protecting with mr. mandela. this is not an unknown island. of course, anything is possible about the they are taking unprecedented steps to make sure the stadium is secure. the treats in the area near here will be closing down in a couple of hours and private vehicles will not be allowed anywhere near the stadium. it is expected to be an emotional day. the program has just been released and there will be remarks by several of mr. mandela's grandchildren and comments from a former political prisoner along with him who served 26 years on rob bin island and remarks from heads of states like president obama and leader
forth that legacy. >> and you first met mr. mandela right after being released from jail. you were in a room alone with him. tell me about that moment. you're young, 20 and impressionable and looking for your place and 20 years later you would be the ambassador for south africa. what happened in that room? >> really pretty incredible to me and hilarious in retrospect. this was immediately after the ticker tape parade we had and i escorted him into city hall, and next i knew we were alone. i discovered in moments of silence, had a weightiness to him. i was probably staring at him awe struck for ten minutes then a voice said, young man, may i trouble you for a glass of water. he said it with a little slight i am patience and it became clear he probably asked several times but i was so dumb struck by him that my feet were rooted. of course, i hurried and got him water and never ever had such pleasure in providing service to another human being. i just wished i could have done more in his service and for his cause. >> we hear people say that nelson mandela is the moral compass for sout
mr. obama travelled to see the cell where mandela was held for nearly two decades. he described his relationship to the man he and many others affectionately called madiba. >> he is a personal hero and i don't think i am u meek in that regard. he's a hero for the world. >> back this south africa, the mood is part sadness, but part celebration. crowds gathered to remember nelson mandela who changed the world by committing his to the freedom of the south african people. >> i have nothing but deep gratitude they have given to me as an individual and let me state this. they were able to achieve anything, i know that this is because i am the servant of the people of south africa. >> it has been more than two decades since nelson mandela walked out of prison, but for those who lived through it, it seemed to be a piece of a larger puzzle. consider when mandela was freed, we were less than a year removed from china's tianamen square. the berlin wall came down the previous november. it was a fleeting moment in history, but for a time it showed humanity around the world was headed in the righ
with the country's leaders. those words lead the new york sometimes article that came out moments ago. mr. mandela spent 27 years in prison after being convicted of treason. by negotiating with captors after his release in 1990, mandela led the african national congress long a banned liberation movement to an lek to recall victory in 1994, first fully democratic election in that country's history. the new york times goes on, mandela served one term as the president and had not been seen in public since the year 2010 when the nation hosted the world cup soccer tournament. decades in prison and insist ens on forgiveness made him a potent symbol of the struggle to end the country's domination and power of peaceful resolution in even the conflicts. we are joined now on the live line, mrs. smith. a difficult day, one we had been informed would be coming. that doesn't make it easier. >> i think south africans are pleased. [ inaudible ] he was a healthy man the most of his life. the last year was painful for him. >> we've clearly lost the connection with mrs. smith her authorized biographer. she was spea
mandela. the man that shaiferre shared t. >>> the exquisite taste. i had the privilege to cook mr. mande mandela's first meal f captivity. ♪ >>> googood evening and thank yu for joining us i'm expwroz. joie chen. >>> but it was also designed to send a message t that the nation was serious about it's war on drugs. in the year since ho how howevey have come together to criticize the guidelines which limit judges gues discretion in handit sensentences. >> prosecutors can strong arm defendants into plea deals. a young man received a sentence that eastern even a judge call. >> 23 years eatio ago weldon waa father of two bhoi bhois boys aa budding record label. >> he was a total joke jokester. >> this is weldon's sister. inafge left he was also a smalle marijuana dealer. trans actions that let him down to this place the fed penitentiary where he has been incarcerated for a debl decade w rchl. >> while we talkin angela called for prison and talked about what led him there. i was young and dumb and it was a big mistake. >> a mistake that owe i e he isg dearly for. >> one of my childhood frien
in johannesburg. byron? >> reporter: it's a bit loud here on the street outside of mr. mandela's home. people singing songs and chants from the movement mr. mandela lead here decades ago. all day long here, a steady stream of humanity, as people have shown up, sometimes entire families. here, we show their last respect to the man this entire nation so adored. as the world mourns the death of nelson mandela through song, dance and tears, details about his grand state funeral are coming out. >> we should all work together to organize the most befitting funeral. >> reporter: beginning tomorrow with a national day of prayer and reflection, for south africa. with an official service on tuesday in johannesburg, where thousands are expected to gather at the fnb stadium, the same stadium where mandela made his last public appearance during the 2010 world cup. the services are expected to be the largest in generations, with prominent leaders and dignitaries from across the globe attending, including president obama and the first lady, who travel to south africa next week, to pay respects, bringing alo
the u.s. to pose sanctions. let's roll video of mr. mandela. he was africa's former president who helped break the country system of racial discrimination. he died this evening, age 95. south african president jacob zuma announced the death at a somber news conference. people are coming here to the south african embassy to pay tribute to mandela. we are going to hear from a 12-year-old girl. she walked here with her father and here is what she had to say. >> i want to pray for his family, him and all the people that are suffering for his loss. i like to say thank you for him and everything he did for us. >> reporter: back out here live, you can see the south african embassy here, the statue and there is a lot of media here. we are in very tight quarters, which is why my voice is lowered. a lot of folks from the local stations, you have international media showing you how nelson mandela touched lives for civil rights around the world. fellow south africans, you know, nelson mandela brought them together as well. he had been in and out of the hospital for months. in june, he was admitted t
courage changed the world. mr. mandela went from freedom fighter to political prisoner to president. >> his message of reconciliat n reconciliation, not vengeance, inspired people everywhere after he negotiated a peaceful end to the brutal segregation of black south africans and forgiveness for what the white government had done, oppressed them and imprisoned him. today, the world is remembering ali con. >> nelson mandela. nelson mandela. ♪ >> in south africa, the grieving and mourning are mixed with songs and celebration. for the man affectionately known by his clan name madibmadiba. remembering the life and legacy of any son mandela. i'm suzanne malveaux. >> i'm michael holmes. thanks for your company. it is interesting how much of a celebration it has been. there is the mourning. there were tears tonight. today it's been singing and dancing, people celebrating the life. >> he seems to have an impact on just about everyone. people around the world are reacting. we are watching live pictures of him being celebrated in the streets of johannesburg. died in the suburbs of johannesb
. mandela and mrs. mandela in the flat in london. it was a small apartment. we met and it was extraordinary. i was in the room with living history. i was in the presence of greatness. this man's humility about the combination, there is no question that nelson mandela was a man who embodied what martin luther king jr. talked about in referring to the spirit of the times. here was a man who was out of a sense of directioning history and those around him. a man who didn't presume to be the mouth piece for god. nevertheless spoke for millions of people not only in south africa, but around the world. the courage it took to for give south africa into its future. his love ethic that they spoke about was the predicate for the expansion of opportunity for africans who were black to join with africans who were white and others to forge the future of that nation. what's interesting as many criticize mr. obama here, president obama who was encouraged by him. i was at the white house when the film was screened. i had the opportunity to see barack obama introduce a film about nelson mandela was a bit of
. especially in the places nelson mandela touched. people are out in the streets. outside mr. mandela's formal house 20 miles from here. and outside his current home here in north johannesburg where he passed away. it may well be after midnight here but the crowds are still growing. there are hundreds here. the mood has changed quite rapidly to one of quiet shock to frankly boisterous celebration of his life. this is a typical almost uniquely south african reaction, greta. people of all colors, many who have wrapped themselves in the south african flag, some holding candles are toy toying, a revolutionary dance. they are singing his name. one young woman outside his home here is holding up a sign saying it's in our hands now. inside the house a large richly furnished home i have been lucky enough to enter many times to film mr. mandela, the former president was surrounded by family members as he passed away. it's widely believed that elders from his home village, mr. mandela was, after all, a deeply traditional man, are now going through rituals. in english, the ceremony they are going through
square. mr. mandela's host on that day was the mayor of bedford, councillor carole ellis. sadly, councillor ellis is seriously ill at present, but i know that she is so proud of her own and of bedford's part in mr. mandela's story. between 1986 and 1990, the right honorable gentleman member for bermondsey and old southwark , i and peter pike, the former member for burnley, made three visits to south africa at the invitation of the followers of christ working for a peaceful resolution of the situation there. on our return from our first visit, on june 17, we made joint speeches in a debate here in the house of commons, referring to each other as our honorable friends -- a point duly noted by hansard. we had gone together -- safety in numbers -- at a time when the anc was still banned, the political situation was deteriorating, violence was abroad, and where the isolation of south africa was impacting on the flow of anything but very polarised information. we were able to report back to our respective party leaders on what we found. i had half an hour with an anxious, worried, an
. i was the wife of a south african freedom fighter, belonged to a rival organization than mr. mandela's. my husband was a pat, pan african congress, mr. mandela was founder of anc, african national congress, others south african national union. i was used to those men and a few women shouting and screaming at each other. they were really arch rivals. when mr. mandela came, he didn't raise his voice. he didn't argue with anybody. he didn't put anybody down. they were rivals. i had never met a south african who wasn't shouting and really angry all the time. i know he was angry, but he didn't use his energy foolishly. so it was a year after that he was imprisoned. i became friends with his wife then, winnie mandela. and we continued to support each other over the years and over the oceans. and she would tell me how he was. he wasn't vitt uperative with t guards. i was part of hillary clinton's delegates when he was inaugurated. i sat there and watched the guards, who had guarded him for 27 years, sitting in the right sights, in the best seats, invited by mr. mandela. not to say look how
coming here throughout the past few days since mr. mandela's death was announced. they have been singing in the streets, they have been chanting. it's been more street party than anything else celebrating the life of mr. mandela. obviously there's also some grief and mourning but most people are trying to focus on the positive, the legacy and the tremendous achievement of mr. mandela and this country during his life. also you have to remember that all these events are taking place over a week. there's the memorial service tomorrow and then for the next three days after that, mandela's body will lie in state at the union builds, the seat of government in pretoria and the body will make a procession from the military hospital to that place each day so there will be people trying to line that route and see what's happening as well to visit the body and pay their respects. and finally the funeral in a distant part of the country where mr. mandela is from, so many events over many days and a lot of emotion overall that. >> ron, thank you. checking the news feed this morning, that massive wint
that lined auburn aven. that was a very sad occasion. when mr. mandela came to atlanta it was a happy joyous occasion for people of atlanta and really certainly for people of our nation and around the world. >> how do you cope while everyone else is mourning? >> i think what we are sad about is the loss at the same token the confr contribution to the ws so incredible. he is now in a better place as we see in the christian tradition. he has gone home to rest with god. he has paid far more duce t duer world community than the average individual would be able to. and for that we are so thankful for this dignified leadership of nelson mandela. >> talk about the similar traits you see between your father and nelson mandela. >> i would say if we talked about various traits of nelson mandela and martin luther king jr. they both unrelenting. >> my dad was unrelenting and mr. mandela was unrelenting for his fight for justice and there are par parallels in those particular areas my dad used his voice to represent the poor and oppressed. president mandela used his voice to represent the poor and oppres
of the congressional black caucus and other circles as they have been noting tonight, lots of concerts in support of mr. mandela, lots of concerts in support of those who said that we should not have any dealings with south africa as long as apartheid was still in place. >> the people for sanctions were on the right side of history because it really did weaken the regime and probably brought them to the bargaining table much quicker. >> in your article, you noted south africa's economic and clinical aspects were intertwined. how so? how did he help to narrow that defined? had growth rates under 1% during the entire apartheid regime. from the time he was a like did until 2008 they were clipping along. that is an astonishing miracle and away. he did that by saying we want free markets. we will not nationalize the minds. we want everyone to be able to sort of compete in our economic system and to take heart. and theyted jobs opened up the labor force. they had a very strong affirmative action program which has worked very well there. they managed to get a lot of people. >> let's talk a little bit about hi
are one of the most humble person i ever met. i will tell you whether mr. mandela arrived today he said to our producer and said what is the subject of today's show? [ applause ] and she said nelson mandela. you are the subject of today's show. and he goes, oh, all right. >> she credits mandela as the inspiration for her school for girls in south africa. our coverage of nelson mandela's life and death continues later this half hour as we hear from mandela's jailer who describes their unusual and long-lasting friendship. you want to keep it here on abc news all morning long. >>> all right. we will turn to other major headlines beginning with something of a reversal by the white house involving the president's uncle who had been facing deportation from the u.s. omar and the president had never met but they said he lived with him three weeks while attending law school. it came after the judge ruled he could stay ignoring a deportationing order two decades ago. >>> libyan government says so far no one claimed responsibility for shooting an american teacher to death as he jogged through the
at madison park high school when mandela arrived. >> mr. nelson mandela. [ cheers ] >> reporter: inside the school, pure excitement. >> you all have filled our hearts. >> reporter: this man was a student there. >> 23 years later i still remember that day as if it were yesterday. you heard about this guy in history and suddenly, you know, he's coming to your high school. it was a surreal moment. >> reporter: in detroit -- ♪ >> reporter: -- tens of thousands flocked to tiger stadium. owen beaver was in the motor city. >> i met him for the first time. i got to tell you, we embraced. >> reporter: it was a whirlwind trip. 8 cities, 12 days. stops in miami, los angeles, washington, d.c., and atlanta. >> to be so young and to meet a leader as great as mandela was a really big moment. >> reporter: this woman was just 10 years old at the time, on the tarmac in atlanta. >> i just remember looking in his face. even as young as i was, i remember thinking just what a kindness there was about him and his eyes thinking how amazing it was for somebody who had been through so much to not have a harden
. your thoughts on nelson mandela. caller: mr. mandela was a man of peace. of forgiveness -- a man forgiveness. a man of inspiration to millions of people around the world. that the truly sad same cannot be said about the man who spoke about earlier today from the white house. noson mandela had divisiveness. he had no enemies. he had -- he did not desire to cause division. barack obama is low. nelson mandela -- host: thank you for your calls. lots of reactions from the former president, george w. bush issuing a statement. -- president obama shortly after the announcement of nelson mandela's death spoke to reporters on his thoughts on the passing of nelson mandela. >> at his trial in 1964, nelson mandela close to statement saying i have fought against white domination. i have fought against black domination. ahave cherished the ideas of democratic and free society in which all persons live together with equal opportunities. it is an ideal which i will hope to live for and to achieve. if needs be, it is an idea for which i'm prepared to die. nelson mandela lived for that ideal, and m
mandela was released from prison in 1992. am i correct, mr. mayor? >> absolutely, derek. my relationship goes before then, one thanksgiving day we sat in at the south african embassy on massachusetts avenue starting a whole movement and on april 4th of thsame year out of that 5,000 d.c. government employees off on administrative leave to go protest and my wife said they were arrested and the first time nelson mandela was freed and came to washington he was my guest. i met him over at the convention center for a big rally movement, gave him keys to the city and so he meant a lot to me, not just as a heroic person, but personally. then in august of last 2006 mayor williams took a delegation to south africa and i visited his home and on that wall was a proclamation from me to him and so we go back. mandela was remarkable. anybody who has been in jail for 27 years and not come out bitter is a big man. i doubt if i could do that. stay in jail for 27 years and come out and be better and not bitter. >> i suppose that's why people marvel so much about nelson mandela's personal character. council
, he has a very close relationship with nelson mand a mandela. their lives are intertwined. mr. obama has said that his first political act as an individual was in support oh of the anti apartheid movement, which mr. mandela, of course, was leading. so there's that. we expect that this could be one of the largest gatherings of heads of states ever together assembled in one place. it's an event that will perhaps rival the funeral of pope john paul ii back in 2005. some 3 million converged upon the vatican. the numbers here at the football stadium where the main event will be held could be as many as 100,000 or so. there are several other venues in the johannesburg area where people will watch on giant televisions. and countless others will cram the streets to get near this area where there will be this huge event going on. and don't forget, after tomorrow, there are still three days of official mourning, where mandela's body will lie in state at the union buildings at the capital. and a final state funeral in qunu where mr. mandela was born and grew up. a week-long series of events, fu
earned the admiration of millions. >> and one wonders what must be passing through mr. mandela's mind at this moment. >> after 27 years in prison, nelson mandela walked into freedom. against all odds, the leader of a rebellion became the leader of national unity. mandela's decade-long rebellion turned him into a freedom fighter, an international hero. >> i fought against white domination. i have fought for every family. >> mandela was born into a privileged family. he supported nonviolence. he became a lawyer and opened the first african law firm. in 1960, mandela turned militant. >> there are many people who feel that it is useless for us to continue talking nonviolence. >> mandela loved up to his name, troublemaker, repeatedly challenging authority. he was convicted of sabotage and conspiracy to overthrow the government and sentence to life in prison. he was cut off from the outside world, but mandela's message and movement endured. his wife became his unofficial ambassador. finally, in 1990, nelson mandela was freed. >> mandela became south africa's first black president and
woman, very dignified woman, you know, mrs. mandela, win any mandela the girls, nani, zuni they have been beautiful through this whole process. i think there is a profound sense of sadness, because when you finally get the word that, you know, the chief is gone, you know, it is overwhelming but i think there is an equal amount of joy and festivity and people celebrating, okay, now this major event has happened, but i think the family is actually very dignified and holding up very well. >> rose: what do we know what is going to happen between now and the actual funeral day? >> yes, there is, you know, there is a number, a series of protocols that have been put in place by the south african government are executing, obviously on the tenth there will be a huge rally in soweto, you know, archbishop tutu will preside over the funeral, the funeral is on the 15th and i would anticipate it would be one of the largest gatherings of heads of state in, you know, in modern history. you may see more heads of state attend mandela's funeral that john f. kennedy's funeral so it is going to be very e
the thought originated. in the mind of mr. mandela and bishop desmond tutu, it was the recognition from our side and on the side of mr. mandela and his colleagues that to continue our hostilities and acrimony would mean the destruction of this country and would lead to a civil war that no one would wish to go. >> reporter: as botha recalls, mandela's message of peace predated the '90s in the early '60s following years of action against apartheid he made his famous speech at the dock that would lead to his imprisonment. >> he said, i afford against white domination. and i afford against black domination. i have challenged the ideal of a democratic and free society in which all persons live together in harmony and with equal opportunities. and then he concluded by saying, this is an ideal i hope to live for and to achieve. but if needs be, it is an ideal for which i'm prepared to die. >> reporter: mandela was an icon. but he had a very human side, too. as botha was to find out when he reached out to mandela during his presidential years. >> mandela is no angel. no humans are angels. his secon
. this is not unexpected given mr. mandela's house. we might ask now how are south africans reacting? >> reporter: richard, news of nelson mandela's death was announced just before midnight. so inevitably still today many of south africans are still learning the news that the father of this nation passed away during the evening. here his suburban home in johannesburg many hundreds of people have come. the mood here is not somber at all, though. there have been very few people here in tears. people have come to celebrate his life and the lives that they've been able to achieve and to live as a result of his sacrifice. people here also wondering precisely what happens next, and we're awaiting details in the next few hours about a lying in state and about nelson mandela's burial, which once diplomats are saying that the plan resembled the biggest state funeral for any former leader south of winston churchill. >> thank you. rohi for us in south africa. now to nbc's brian williams with a look at mandela's incredible life and unwavering spirit. >> to deny any person human rights is the challenge of very humanit
klerk made a historic announcement. >> the government has taken a firm decision to release mr. mandela unconditionally. >> teichner: a moment forever seared into our memory. after more than a quarter century behind bars, nelson mandela stepped into the light. >> amandla! >> teichner: mandela at 71 emerged looking not like a broken prisoner, but like a king. >> he had won. but mandela is famous for his smile, but that smile is not there. and i believe he was deeply aware of the enormous challenge and responsibility that now lay on him. ♪ >> we will reach the goal of liberating the black people of this country within our lifetime. >> teichner: nelson mandela was free, but the fight for freedom was far from over. >> pelley: when we come back, "60 minutes'" bob simon reflects on mandela's journey from prisoner to president. honestly, i'm not looking for five-star treatment. i get times are tight. but it's hard to get any work done like this. then came this baby -- small but with windows and office. it runs my work stuff. ...and i can use apps like flipboard for news, or xbox video to wat
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 173 (some duplicates have been removed)